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2017 Workshops:

Schedules & Descriptions

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Free Tool Sharpening
Workshop

Sunday, June 18, 6–9 p.m.

Putnam Hall, Room 120
Instructors: Morris & Daddona

 

A three-hour workshop on tool sharpening will be available to registered students in Basic Violin Set-up and Tool Use. The workshop will include a lecture, demonstrations, and hands-on practice with knives, scrapers, planes, chisels, and gouges. Topics covered include: shop safety, grinding, honing, and evaluating the sharpness of your tools.

Walk-ins are welcome although pre-registration is appreciated.

Free Tool Sharpening
Workshop

Sunday, June 25, 6–9 p.m.

Putnam Hall, Room 120
Instructor: Kellogg

 

A three-hour workshop on tool sharpening will be available to all registered students. The workshop will include a lecture, demonstrations, and hands-on practice with knives, scrapers, planes, chisels, and gouges. Topics covered include: shop safety, grinding, honing, and evaluating the sharpness of your tools.

Walk-ins are welcome although pre-registration is appreciated.

Free Small Business
Workshop

Tuesday, July 11, 6–8 p.m.

Putnam Hall, Room 120
Instructor: Richard Grogan, Ph.D.

 

Richard Grogan, Ph.D., State Director, Department NH Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at Paul College of Business and Economics will speak about the resources available for small business. The optional presentation helps current or prospective shop owners/ managers understand the basics of successful business operations.

Bow Repair I

June 19–23

Monday through Friday
8–11:30 am. and 1–4 p.m.

Evenings
Monday through Thursday
4–5 p.m. and 7–9 p.m.

4.4 CEUs

Putnam Hall, Room 102
Distinguished Craftsperson: Hannings
Assistant: Kapousouz

What You'll Learn

Rather than replacing a bow that needs repair, fix it! This workshop will cover routine bow repairs that will keep bows in good working order. Often bows that come in for rehairing also need some repair work. Instruction will include: screw and eyelet repairs; tip replacement; windings; leather grips; cambering and straightening; as well as replacing pearl slides and dots. How these repairs affect the playability of the bow will be emphasized. This workshop, in addition to Bow Rehairing, will best prepare you for commonly needed repairs. After Bow Repair I, participants are encouraged to take complementary classes in either Bow Rehairing or Bow Repair II.

Materials and Tools Needed

You will need a number of student-level bows in need of repair (any condition, several if possible). For a complete list of tools and suppliers go to: www.learn.unh.edu/violin/tools. If you have any questions about advance preparation for this workshop, contact Lynn Hannings at lynnh@lahbows.com.

Bow Rehairing

Offered twice:
Take one or both weeks

June 26–30
July 3–7

Monday through Friday
8–11:30 a.m. and 1–4 p.m.

Evenings
Monday through Thursday
4–5 p.m. and 7–9 p.m.

4.4 CEUs

Putnam Hall, Room 102
Distinguished Craftsperson: Hannings
Assistant: Kapousouz

What You'll Learn

The most frequent repair needed by string players is rehairing of the bow. This workshop focuses on the rehairing process and consists of a week of intense study. Ample time will be allotted for hands-on experience and practice. A solid foundation in rehairing will greatly enhance your experience in bowmaking, bow repair, and other more advanced workshops.

Materials and Tools Needed

You will need a number of student-level bows that need only rehairing. For a complete list of tools and suppliers go to: www.learn.unh.edu/violin/tools. If you have any questions about advance preparation for this workshop, contact Lynn Hannings at lynnh@lahbows.com.

Bow Making
With a Focus on Historical Preservation

Offered twice:
Take one or both weeks

July 10–14
July 17–21

Monday through Friday
8–11:30 a.m. and 1–4 p.m.

Evenings
Monday–Thursday
4–5 p.m. and 7–9 p.m.

4.4 CEUs per week

Putnam Hall, Room 102
Distinguished Craftsperson: Hannings
Assistant: Brough

What You'll Learn

Each year this hands-on workshop focuses on the French bow makers who created bows renowned for their playability as well as artistic beauty. Whether restoring a bow or making a new one, it is helpful to know the time-honored techniques used for centuries in France. Under the direction of an instructor, who knows and respects the fine French bow tradition of handwork, you’ll learn techniques that are both practical and fundamental. During Bow Making, you will work on your bows independently with personalized guidance by the instructor. The one-on- one instructional format is designed to maximize your time and talents. You may attend one or both weeks and all skill levels are welcome. It is helpful to take Bow Rehairing before Bow Making, but it is not necessary.

Materials and Tools Needed

For a complete list of tools and suppliers can be found on Lynn Hannings' website. If you have any questions about advance preparation for this workshop, contact Lynn Hannings at lynnh@lahbows.com.

Bow Repair II & Tool Making

June 26–30

Monday through Friday
8–11:30 a.m. and 1–4 p.m.

Evenings
Monday–Thursday
4–5 p.m. and 7–9 p.m.

4.4 CEUs

Putnam Hall, Room 111
Distinguished Craftsperson: Rubino
Assistant: Curry

What You'll Learn

Note: You DO NOT need to take Bow Repair I to take this workshop. This workshop covers some common bow repairs and techniques. It is for all levels of experience and provides essential information for the individual who repairs, rehairs, or makes bows. Topics include bow head splines, frog eyelet bushing, and specialty tool making as well as other repairs and techniques. The use of a metal cutting lathe and other small power tools will be presented. If your plans include studying frog and button making: the lathe, knife making, and drill press techniques taught in this class will help to prepare you for the frog and button making class. Returning students may work independently on their own projects under the guidance of the instructor. To discuss advanced preparation for this workshop and meet your personal goals, contact George Rubino at george@rubinobows.com at least four weeks prior to your arrival.

Materials and Tools Needed

Bring bows in need of repair. A limited number will be available at the workshop for those who don't have any. For a complete list of tools and suppliers go to www.learn.unh.edu/violin/tools.

Frog and Button Making

Offered twice:
Take one or both weeks

July 3–7
July 10–14

Monday through Friday
8 a.m.–11:30 and 1–4 p.m.

Evenings
Monday through Thursday
4–5 p.m. and 7–9 p.m.

4.4 CEUs

Putnam Hall, Room 111
Distinguished Craftperson: Rubino
Assistant: Curry

What You'll Learn

This course is for students of all levels of experience, bow makers, and bow repairers. Frog and button making are not only necessary skills for the bow maker, but also essential skills for bow repairers and restorers. The frog and button are very important factors in bow playability. A frog and button that compliments the stick will ensure that the bow will play as well as possible. Mr. Rubino will present the process of making a hand-crafted frog and button so that the student will learn how to either make a frog and button for their own bow or learn from making how to restore a frog or button on an existing bow. It is recommended that the student (especially those with limited experience) consider attending both weeks of this course because of the amount of information and the time needed to make both a frog and button.

Materials and Tools Needed

For a complete list of tools and suppliers go to www.learn.unh.edu/violin/tools. If you have any questions about preparation for this workshop, please contact Mr. Rubino at george@rubinobows.com.

NEW! Finishing Bows

July 17–21

Monday through Friday
8–11:30 a.m. and 1–4 p.m.

Evenings
Monday through Thursday
4–5 p.m. and 7–9 p.m.

4.4 CEUs

Putnam Hall, Room 103
Distinguished Craftsperson: Rubino
Assistant: Curry

What You'll Learn

Many important decisions when making a bow occur during the finishing process. Final weight, balance, strength and varnishing are critical in enhancing playability and marketability. Mr. Rubino will work with each student individually guiding and advising them on the various options each bow presents. The students will be required to bring sticks, frogs and buttons that are prepared and ready for finishing. In order to best evaluate the playability of their bows students are encouraged to bring an instrument on which to play.

A tool list and an outline of how to prepare the bow, frog and button for class will be available upon registration. This course is for students and professional bow makers alike. Experience in bow making is required. To be fully prepared, it is recommended that the students have attended the UNH Violin Institute classes on frog and button making, stick making, and rehairing or equivalent experience.

Materials and Tools Needed

For a complete list of tools and suppliers go to www.learn.unh.edu/violin/tools.If you have any questions about advance preparation for this workshop, contact contact Mr. Rubino at george@rubinobows.com.

Basic Violin Set-Up & Tool Use

June 19–23

Monday through Friday
8–11:30 a.m. and 1–4 p.m.

Evenings
Monday through Thursday
4–5 p.m. and 7–9 p.m.

4.4 CEUs

Putnam Hall, Room 103
Distinguished Craftsperson: Morris
Assistant: Daddona

What You'll Learn

Basic Violin Set-up is a hands-on introductory workshop that addresses the basics of 4/4 violin set-up and teaches some of the basic bench skills required for repair and maintenance of a full-size violin. Topics include: proper use of bench grinders; sharpening knives, plane blades, and chisels; fitting pegs in the scroll; setting and making sound-posts; and making bridges. We will also discuss string selection and sound-post adjustments, although keep in mind the practice of sound adjustments takes years to master.

Basic Violin Set-up is highly recommended for music teachers, musicians, shop owners, and others interested in string instrument repair. While you do not need to have previous experience working on violins, previous woodworking experience is beneficial. Basic Violin Set-up is highly recommended to as a precursor to Basic Violin & Stringed Instrument Repair II.

Materials and Tools Needed

Two full-sized violins with ebony fingerboards. Inexpensive violins with or without pegs are recommended. They may be previously set up. We will be using these to fit new pegs, sound-posts, and bridges. They should be in good condition with no open cracks or seams. Other items needed include pegs (regular thickness and thick shaft), bridges, sound-post material, and strings. A complete list of suggested tools and materials can be found at www.learn.unh.edu/violin/tools.

Basic Violin & Stringed Instrument Repair II

June 26–30

Monday through Thursday
8–11:30 a.m. and 1–4 p.m.

Friday
8–11:30 a.m. and 1–3:30 p.m.

Evenings
Monday through Thursday
4–5 p.m. and 7–9 p.m.

4.4 CEUs

Putnam Hall, Room 103
Distinguished Craftsperson: Wiessmeyer
Assistant: Kellogg

What You'll Learn

This hands-on workshop is recommended for individuals who took Basic Violin Set-up & Tool Use and for those with some previous repair experience. It will reinforce and continue Basic Violin Set-up lessons and cover finger board dressing and upper nut finishing, set-up and adjustment of cellos and violas, fractional size instruments, five strings violins, planing a fingerboard, adjusting a nut and saddle, set-up of all bowed string instrument except bass, tool sharpening, and sound adjustments. You’ll receive one-on-one guidance.

Materials and Tools Needed

One or two of the following instruments with ebony fingerboards: 4/4 violins, fractional size violin, viola (any size), cello (full or ¾), five string violin (preferably never set up). Two sets of fittings per instrument. Please refer to the Tools and Materials list online. Basic tool boxes may be rented from Randy Kellogg. Thanks to the 2016 donation of tools in memory of a past participant, Adrian Teuscher, the Institute has a limited supply of tools to supplement tool box rentals. A complete list of suggested tools and materials can be found at www.learn.unh.edu/violin/tools.

Intermediate Violin Repair &
Sound Adjustments

July 3–7

Monday through Thursday
8–11:30 a.m. and 1–4 p.m.

Friday
8–11:30 a.m. and 1–3:30 p.m.

Evenings
Monday through Thursday
4–5 p.m. and 7–9 p.m.

4.4 CEUs

Putnam Hall, Room 103
Distinguished Craftsperson: Wiessmeyer
Assistant: Kellogg

What You'll Learn

Intermediate Repair will cover frequently requested repair procedures, including gluing cracks, correcting neck projections, peg bushings, and edge repairs. Basic retouch principals, and the retouch of nicks, scratches, and worn areas on violins, violas, and cellos will be demonstrated. You will receive daily, personalized instruction to guide you through your repair project. In-depth discussion and teaching demonstrations will focus on the topic of each student’s repair project. Custom sound adjustments for musicians will be presented and discussed. Additional topics relevant to repairs at hand will be reviewed as appropriate. This hands-on workshop is designed for students who have taken Basic Violin & Stringed Instrument Repair or who have equivalent, practical experience with violin set-up and minor repairs.

Materials and Tools Needed

Two or three stringed instruments needing any of the above mentioned repairs. Please do not bring violins with integral bass bars or an integral neck or upper block. You should already be proficient in tool sharpening. A complete list of suggested tools and materials can be found at www.learn.unh.edu/violin/tools.

Intermediate-Advanced Violin
Repair & Sound Adjustments

July 10–14

Monday through Thursday
8–11:30 a.m. and 1–4 p.m.

Friday
8–11:30 a.m. and 1–3:30 p.m.

Evenings
Monday through Thursday
4–5 p.m. and 7–9 p.m.

4.4 CEUs

Putnam Hall, Room 103
Distinguished Craftsperson: Wiessmeyer
Assistant: Kellogg

What You'll Learn

In this continuation of violin repair study, students’ more advanced repair projects will be discussed and shared as classroom learning opportunities. Each student receives personalized daily instruction at the bench to guide them through their project. This workshop will focus on neck-resetting, neck shaping, coloring and varnishing of the neck, plate and bar thickness, and the gluing and retouching of old cracks. Special topics covered include custom sound adjustments for musicians and basic violin identification. Returning violin repair students who already have moderate experience in repair and wish to expand their knowledge of practical and useful techniques at the bench are welcome to participate. A good knowledge of tool sharpening and tool usage is required.

Materials and Tools Needed

NOTE: This workshop is NOT designed for work on fine Old Italian violins.
Bring two or three instruments, or parts thereof, needing any of the above mentioned repairs. You should have a comprehensive set of tools, including clamps, brushes, and cutting tools. A complete list of suggested tools and materials can be found at www.learn.unh.edu/violin/tools.

Violin & Viola Building

Offered three weeks:
Take one or more weeks!

June 19–23
June 26–30
July 3–7

Monday through Friday
8 a.m.–Noon and 1–3:30 p.m.

Evenings
Monday through Thursday
7–9 p.m.

4.0 CEUs per week

Putnam Hall, Room 101
Geigenbaumaster: Kloss
Assistant: Bennett

What to Expect

It is recommended that students begin working on two instruments simultaneously; one with step-by-step guidance of the instructor, and the 2nd instrument in your free time. You will learn in groups according to your skill level and progress. In order to maximize learning, we recommend that you enroll for at least two weeks each summer. Beginners are encouraged to start during the first week. Each student will work at his or her pace. Typically, it takes a professional violin maker 4 weeks or less to complete a quality made violin in the white and varnished. It takes a student quite a bit more time, ten weeks or more, depending on experience, ability and focus.

What You'll Learn

Beginning Students:

Construction begins with the creation of templates and molds, followed by the fitting of blocks, planing, bending and setting ribs and linings. You may borrow a mold from the instructor, if you choose. In the first week you will be planing the top and back surfaces, getting them ready to make a joint. The first week will also include instruction on tool usage and safety, and sharpening. The intent is for beginning students to acquire new skills for a solid foundation in continued violin building.

Intermediate Students: (New students at this level)

Work begins with the joining of top and backs, establishing the outline, and carving the arching in the rough. The outline of top and back is finalized to an even distance of the rib out line. Students refine the arching of top and back, first with a gauge, thumb plane and then with scrapers. Next, students progress to the fitting of the purfling. Finally, the channel and edges need to be perfected before the mold can be removed and the excavation of the inside of top and back begins. The instructor suggests working on a two instruments to improve your skills and deepen your understanding of lessons taught through repetition. In German, Übung macht den Meister means practice creates a master.

Intermediate II Students:

Continuing or returning students advance and hone their skill for the more difficult portion of making an instrument. The excavation of top and back continues or begins using gauge, thumb plane and scraper. By the time we transition from the thumb plane to the scraper, we are assessing the acoustical possibilities and the use of tap tones. Some students may advance to cutting the f-holes and fitting of bass bars. If you are a new violin builder, keep in mind the use of tap tones is a challenge. More experienced students experience more success with tap tones. Treat this craft with respect, enthusiasm and perseverance, and then you will find success.

Advanced Students:

Proceed to the final stages of building your instrument. While external and internal work has been completed, there are a few more challenges ahead of you. Carving a scroll, fitting a fingerboard and setting the neck take advanced skills to complete the job. The final task, which requires intense focus, attention and tool skills, is to fit 5 different dimensions that come together simultaneously. The long-term goal is for students to complete an instrument “in the white.” Under the guidance of Master Violin Maker Horst Kloss, you will succeed and enjoy the fruit of your labor.

Materials and Tools Needed

A list of required tools and materials, along with suppliers, is available at www.learn.unh.edu/violin/tools. All students should bring their own tools, wood, sheet metal for templates, and building materials. You may contact Mr. Kloss at professional.development@unh.edu for advice about purchasing the necessary tools and materials.

Advanced Violin
Intensive I: Bass
Bar Study

Modes and Tap Tones with Old World Precision through Modern Technology

July 10–14

Monday through Friday
8 a.m.–noon and 1–3:30 p.m.

Evenings
Monday through Thursday
7–9 p.m.

4.0 CEUs

Putnam Hall, Room 103
Geigenbaumeister: Kloss
Assistant: Genduso

What You'll Learn

Every violin maker needs to develop expertise in the area of acoustics. Focusing on the old world precision combined with modern technology, Master Violin Maker Horst Kloss will share his experience working with bass bars, modes, and tap tones.

Students will learn why an instrument needs a bass bar and how the sound of a bow string instrument is produced. After establishing a base line regarding the instrument under examination, a plan of action will be implemented. Instruction includes: selecting the wood and where to place a bass bar, as well as fitting and graduating a new bass bar. Tap tones and their acoustical implications will be thoroughly investigated. Precision work requiring advanced skills will be covered. Prior knowledge of sharpening and handling of tools is required for successful completion of these techniques.

Materials and Tools Needed

For a complete list of materials and tools, go to www.learn.unh.edu/violin/tools. You may contact Mr. Kloss at professional.development@unh.edu with questions.

Advanced Violin
Intensive II: Neck
Setting

With a Focus on Conservation and Restoration Techniques

July 17–21

Monday through Friday
8 a.m.–noon and 1–3:30 p.m.

Evenings
Monday through Thursday
7–9 p.m.

4.0 CEUs

Putnam Hall, Room 103
Geigenbaumeister: Kloss
Assistant: Genduso

What You'll Learn

The Intensive Study course on neck setting is designed to teach you the intricate and detailed aspects of necks and bridges with respect to acoustical properties of an instrument. Instruction addresses the topics of optimal neck angles, the fine tuning of downward pressure of the strings, carving an acoustically superior bridge, bridge heights, and bridge placement.

After establishing a base line regarding the instrument under examination, a plan of action will be implemented. Students will learn how to remove a neck properly, practice adjustments and learn how these changes affect tone color, volume and projection. Master Violin Maker Horst Kloss will demonstrate preparation of templates, sample bridges and sound posts. The process for new instruments includes fitting of a finger board, neck foot, neck and trimming excess wood to fit a new bridge. Precision work requiring advanced skills will be covered. Prior knowledge of sharpening and handling of tools is required for successful completion of these techniques.

Materials and Tools Needed

For a complete list of materials and tools, go to www.learn.unh.edu/violin/tools. You may contact Mr. Kloss at professional.development@unh.edu with questions.


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